Desmos – For Math Teachers

Desmos Changes How We Teach Math desmos.com Desmos is so much more than an online graphing calculator. Check out teacher.desmos.com for building interactive math lessons. Desmos allows us to move from doing math to exploring math. Try out this slope of the line activity to “Land the plane” from desmos.com Built in Discussion Classroom discussion […]

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from Teacher Tech https://alicekeeler.com/2019/08/01/desmos-for-math-teachers/…

Mounting Issues On Your Mac Can Be Resolved

It’s not a dreadful message. Nonetheless, it still is an alarming one. You don’t want to to see the message “Disk Not Ejected Properly” on your screen, do you?

The message “Disk Not Ejected Properly” usually appears when you unplug a cable or disconnect power to a drive without making sure the disk has unmounted from the Finder after selecting it and choosing File > Eject [Name] or clicking the Eject icon next to its name in the sidebar.

(Via: https://www.macworld.com/article/3393441/what-to-do-if-your-macs-hard-drive-starts-unmounting-itself-unexpectredly.html)

It’s a message you don’t expect to see, especially if you’ve just successfully ejected the drive. The thing is, it happens and maybe, you shouldn’t ignore it.

When you mount a drive in the Finder, you expect it to stay there. If you’ve found that your previously reliable external hard disk drive or SSD starts ejecting itself, trouble is obviously afoot.

(Via: https://www.macworld.com/article/3393441/what-to-do-if-your-macs-hard-drive-starts-unmounting-itself-unexpectredly.html)

Here’s something you should do right away when you do see that message.

If unexpected unmountings continue, try to make a backup immediately. This may reveal other problems, but it’s important you have as current a copy of what’s on that drive as possible, as the hardware may be about to die—or the drive may at least be hard to access while you work through solutions.

(Via: https://www.macworld.com/article/3393441/what-to-do-if-your-macs-hard-drive-starts-unmounting-itself-unexpectredly.html)

Mac expert, Glenn Fleishman, shares some possibilities as to why your Mac is not mounting. He also shares some helpful troubleshooting tips.

• A bad cable. Even if you haven’t touched the cable since you attached an external drive years ago to a desktop computer, cables can fail. This is true even if it’s the one included with the drive or you purchased one from a company with strong positive product reviews. Cable failure is more likely for drives that are routinely connected and disconnected to a computer. Swap another identical cable, as it’s the cheapest way to isolate the problem.
• A faulty power connection. Check that the adapter is plugged in to the drive firmly and that the AC power plug isn’t jiggling in the outlet or surge protector. If the drive has a power light separate from an activity LED, observe it and see if it’s flickering or otherwise inconstant. Even with a power light, it can be tough to monitor and hard to test if a power adapter is the culprit, because AC power adapters are rarely the same among different companies (or even models of drive from the same company). You may need to call the company or use online tech support to get additional troubleshooting. The company may be able to send you free or for a small fee a replacement adapter if it thinks that’s the problem.

The BlueKeep situation gets murkier

There have been rumors for the past two weeks that there’s a working BlueKeep exploit on the darkweb. We’ve been fielding (and blocking) many posts on AskWoody claiming that the BlueKeep exploit is real and living in the ooze. Catalin Cimpanu (who, along with Kevin Beaumont, are my guiding lights on the topic) just posted […]

from AskWoody https://www.askwoody.com/2019/the-bluekeep-situation-gets-murkier/…

Complaints: Can’t get to the Microsoft Store when switching Surface Go out of S Mode

Thx to Barb Bowman. This from the MS Answers forum: I recently purchased a Microsoft Surface Go for travel, and although I’m enjoying it thus far there is a need to switch out of S Mode to install one or two additional programs. I’ve followed all of the steps to reach the “Switch Out of […]

from AskWoody https://www.askwoody.com/2019/complaints-cant-get-to-the-microsoft-store-when-switching-surface-go-out-of-s-mode/…

Where do we stand with Feature Update deferrals in Win 10 Pro v1903?

What has happened to Feature Update deferrals in Win10 Pro v1903? Everyone has been lauding the “Pause update” feature added to Windows Update in v1903 Home Edition since Microsoft sacked SAC Targeted (pun intended). But there has been no documentation (that I am aware of) about the changes to Win10 Pro v1903. I have upgraded […]

from AskWoody https://www.askwoody.com/2019/where-do-we-stand-with-feature-update-deferrals-in-win-10-pro-v1903/…

Want To Clean Up Your Windows 10? Try Defragging It.

“Defragging” or defragment sounds pretty technical. Truth is, there’s really nothing technical about it. It just refers to a process that can help boost your computer’s performance.

The process is very simple and it can help every computer-user like you. So, if you want to boost your computer’s performance by cleaning up your hard drive in Windows 10, you can do so by defragging it.

It’s simple to defragment – or ‘defrag’ – your storage in Windows 10. If you have a hard drive you’ve been using for a long time without disk defragmentation, you may have noticed performance steadily slowing down.

That likely means it’s time to perform a defrag on that drive.

(Via: https://www.techradar.com/how-to/how-to-defrag-windows-10)

You might wonder how defragging a hard drive can help boost the performance of your computer. Here’s what happens when you defrag a hard drive.

Disk defragmentation moves chunks of information on a disk around so that related data are physically closer together on the hard disk. This helps improve speeds on the disk, as more data can be read consecutively without the need to jump around between sections of the disk. It can also allow for faster write speeds for the same reason, as newly written data can go on the drive in order.

(Via: https://www.techradar.com/how-to/how-to-defrag-windows-10)

Here are the steps to defrag your hard disk.

• Step one: Press the Windows Key and type ‘defrag’ into the search bar, then select “Defragment and Optimize Drives” from the results.
If your search bar is misbehaving or you don’t see the above results, you can also reach the tool by opening the Control Panel, selecting System and Security, and then selecting “Defragment and optimize your drives” underneath the Administrative Tools header.
You can get to the Control Panel by pressing the Windows Key and typing “Control Panel” into the search bar and selecting the result or you can open the Start Menu, scroll down to the Windows System folder, open it, and select Control Panel from inside.
• Step two: Examine the list of your computer’s drives in the Defrag tool, and find the hard drive you want to defrag.
• Step three: Check the “Media Type” column for your drive and ensure it is not a solid state drive (SSD). Only proceed with defragmentation for a hard drive.
• Step four: Click on the drive you want to defrag, then press the “Optimize” button below the list of drives.
Windows 10 may prompt you to approve the action before it proceeds.
• Step five: Sit back and let the Defrag tool work. Depending on the size of your drive and the level of fragmentation, it may take a considerable amount of time